The bogus HPV vaccine article that just won’t die

vaccinationI came across this article on Facebook today: Lead Developer of HPV Vaccines Comes Clean, Warns Parents & Young Girls It’s All A Giant Scam. It was published on some entertainment website called feelguide.com back in July, but it just won’t die. It’s got 198,000 Facebook likes, and it’s been tweeted 631 times. It claims that Diane Harper, a scientist involved in the clinical trials for Gardasil, one of the HPV vaccines, did a 180 and decided that the vaccine is no good. According to the article, she announced this abrupt change of face at the 4th International “Converence” on Vaccination in Reston, Virginia. She came clean to the audience so she “could sleep at night.”

The article conveniently makes it very difficult to distinguish between the (supposed) paraphrasing of what Harper actually said at that meeting and the interpolations of other people. It says scary things like “44 girls are officially known to have died from [HPV] vaccines.” Uh, really? Wouldn’t that death toll be all over the newspapers? Well, maybe not, since it’s not at all true.

You might wonder how this website can get away with printing things that are demonstrably false. Yesterday somebody pointed out to me the feelguide.com website’s disclaimer: “Feelguide.com contains published articles, speculation, assumptions, opinions as well as factual information. Information on this site may or may not be true and is not meant to be taken as fact.” And the author? Is he a vaccine expert? Nope, his name is Brent Lambert. As it happens, he is also Editor-In-Chief of this fabulous website, and you can reach him at his gmail address. Super professional.

Where did this article come from, you ask? Almost word for word, it was taken from an article that appeared on the website LifeWise in June. This article, in turn, seems to have drawn on a 2009 article in the Sunday Express by Lucy Johnston. (Note: The Sunday Express may sound respectable, but it’s actually a British tabloid.)  Their claims that Diane Harper said all this stuff were debunked back in 2009, the very week that they came out. Ben Goldacre of the Guardian talked to Diane Harper himself. In Harper’s words:

“I did not say that Cervarix was as deadly as cervical cancer. I did not say that Cervarix could be riskier or more deadly than cervical cancer. I did not say that Cervarix was controversial, I stated that Cervarix is not a ‘controversial drug’. I did not ‘hit out’ – I was contacted by the press for facts. And this was not an exclusive interview.”

The original article was promptly taken off the Sunday Express website, and Harper complained to the Press Complaints Commission.

How did this whole brouhaha start? For whatever reason, Harper decided to speak at the 4th International Public Conference on Vaccination, held by the National Vaccine Information Center in Reston Virginia. Sounds bland enough, right? But as it happens, the NVIC is one of the largest, most vocal anti-vaccine groups out there. Why would she attend such an event? I guess it’s possible that she was tricked, that she didn’t realize what she was getting into. Working in the vaccine field, it seems she would have to be familiar with the NVIC, though. Maybe she was trying to engage vaccine critics, hoping that a little education would bring them around. Perhaps we’ll never know. But not surprisingly, it appears that attendees twisted her words in the press.

So how did all the same 2009 tabloid junk get recycled in a 2013 article? And why do people take it at face value? Lord only knows.

I frequently see people post articles like this in places like Facebook after adding something like, “C’mon, people. Do your research. Vaccines are dangerous.” I am all for people doing research about vaccines. There is so much great vaccine research available that if most vaccine skeptics really delved into it, I think they would rapidly change their minds. But does anyone really consider reading an article like this research? Even if the lack of any citations didn’t clue you in, and you didn’t know about the backstory for this chunk of lies, wouldn’t the misspelled words, the disclaimer that says the website contains  information that “may or may not be true,” and the Editor-in-Chief’s gmail address give you reason to pause? Is this really where you want to get the information you use to make medical decisions? Feelguide.com? C’mon people. Do your research. For real.

If you’re interested, more information about this particular zombie anti-vaccine meme can be found on the Respectful Insolence and Skeptical Raptor blogs.

One thought on “The bogus HPV vaccine article that just won’t die

  1. Pingback: Thoughts 3.2 | Life of this city girl

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